Number, money etc.

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Question English
Answer English

nought/zero/oh.
We usually speak the number 0 as nought (mainly GB) or zero (mainly USA). In telephone numbers we say oh.
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0.

one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine.
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1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen.
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10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.

twenty, twenty-one, twenty-two, thirty, forty, fifty, sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety.
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20, 21, 22, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90.

a/one hundred, a/one hundred and one, a/one hundred and thirty-eight, five hundred and seventy-two, a/one thousand, thirty-six thousand four hundred and twenty-nine, a/one million.
In British English and comes between the hundreds and the rest of the number, e.g. five hundred and seventy-two. But Americans say five hundred seventy-two without and.
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100. 101. 138. 572. 1,000. 36,429. 1,000,000.
In informal English we can say a hundred or thousand etc. instead of one hundred or one thousand, but only at the beginning of a number.

hundred, thousand, million etc. do not have -s except in indefinite numbers,
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e.g. There were thousands of people in the stadium.

one thousand is written
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1,000 or 1000.

In British English a billion usually means one thousand million, but it can mean one million million.

I've got exactly £12.69 on me.
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£12.69, no more and no less.

I've read about fifty pages of the book.
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not exactly fifty, perhaps between forty and sixty.

We've had this washing-machine over ten years/more than ten years now.
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perhaps eleven or twelve years.

The job will take at least five days.
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five days or more.

He earns under £100/less than £100 a week.
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perhaps £90 or £95.

There are almost/nearly 4 million people without a job in this country.
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only a few less than 4 million, perhaps 3,900,000.

first, second, third, fourth, fifth, eighth, ninth, tenth.
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1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 8th, 9th, 10th.

eleventh, twelfth, thirteenth, twentieth, fortieth, fiftieth, eighty-sixth, ninetieth, hundredth/one hundredth.
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11th, 12th, 13th, 20th, 40th, 50th, 8th, 90th, 100th.

(one) hundred and first, (one) hundred and thirty-third, (one) hundred and fifty-seventh, (one) thousandth.
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101st. 133rd. 157th. 1,000th.

The British runner David Barton came tenth in the race.
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10th.

They've already got five children, and she's expecting a sixth.
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6th.

The washing-machine has broken down for the third time this year.
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3rd.

Today's programme is the (one) hundred and seventy-eighth in the series.
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178th.

Elizabeth II.
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Elizabeth the second.

We use once, twice etc. to express frequency.
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I clean my teeth once a day/twice a day/three times a day/four times a day.

we use times with
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numbers above two.

a/one half. half an hour.
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1/2

a/one third. a third of a mile.
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1/3

three quarters. three quarters of a pound.
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3/4

five eighths. five eighths of a inch.
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5/8

one and a half. one and a half days/a day and a half.
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1 1/2

three and two thirds. three and two third metres.
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3 2/3

five and a quarter. five and a quarter hours.
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5 1/4

thirty-three over seventy-six or yhirty-three seventy sixths.
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33/76

point five/nought point five.
zero point five (USA) (1/2)
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0.5

two point three three. (2 1/3)
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2.33

five point seven five (5. 3/4)
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5.75

six point oh eight
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6.08

fifty per cent.
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50%

two and a half per cent.
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2 1/2%

six point two five per cent.
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6.25%

Sixteen and seven is twenty-three. Sixteen plus seven equals twenty-three.
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16+7=23

Eighteen take away five is thirteen. Eighteen minus five equals thirteen.
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18-5=13

Four nines are thirty-six. Four times nine is thirty-six. Four multiplied by nine equals thirty-six.
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4x9=36

Twenty-seven divided by three is/equals nine.
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27:3=9

Telephone 0270 53399
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oh two seven oh, five three three nine nine. oh two seven oh, five double three double nine.

a penny one p
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1p

ten pence/ten p
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10p

a pound/one pound
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£1

three pound(s) seventy-five pence. three pounds(s) seventy-five. three seventy-five
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£3-75 or £3.75

a/one cent
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a/one dollar
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$1

three (dollars) seventy-five (cents)
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$3-75

23 June/23rd June the twenty-third of June. twenty-third June (USA)
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June 23rd/June 23 June the twenty-third. June twenty-third (USA)

nineteen eighty-three
In Britain 1.4.83 = 1st April 1983. In America 1.4.83 = 4th January 1983.
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1983

seven o'clock. seven (informal)
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7:00 We only use o'clock on the hour. We can leave it out in informal speech, e.g. I'll see you at seven.

eight a.m./eight o'clock in the morning ten p.m./ten o'clock in the evening
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8:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m. We use a.m. (before noon) and p.m. (after noon) or in the morning/in the afternoon/in the evening/at night to make clear which part of the day we mean.

half past seven/seven thirty. half seven (informal)
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7:30 We normally use half past seven, five to ten etc. in informal English. We use seven thirty, nine fifty-five etc. to talk about a timetable

(a) quarter past seven/seven fifteen
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7:15

(a) quarter to eight/seven forty-five
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7:45

twenty (minutes) past nine/nine twenty
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9:20

five (minutes) to ten/nine fifty-five
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9:55

twenty-three minutes past ten/ten twenty-three
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10:23 We can leave out minutes only after 5, 10, 20 and 25, e.g. twenty past nine but twenty-one minutes past nine.

fourteen minutes to eleven/ten forty-six
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10:46 after and of also used in American English instead of past and to, e.g. twenty after nine, a quarter of eight.

sixteen oh eight
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16:08

twenty-one (hundred) hours
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21:00 The 24-hour clock is used in timetables. For times on the hour we sometimes say hundred hours.

1 inch = 25.4 mm
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I need a piece of wood about an eight of an inch (1/8")/three milimetres (3 mm) thick.

1 inch = 2.54 cm
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Kay is five feet six inches (5 ft 6 ins/5'6")/a hundred and sixty-eight centimetres (168 cm) tall.

12 inches = 1 foot = 30.48 cm
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A metre (1 m) is longer than a yard (1 yd).

3 feet = 1 yard = 91.44 cm. 1760 yards = 1 mile = 1.61 km.
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It's five miles/eight kilometres (8 km) to Bath.

1 ounce = 28.35 gm
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I need four ounces (4 oz)/a hundred grams (100 gm) of flour.

16 ounces = 1 pound = 0.454 kg
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Four pounds (4 lbs)/two kilos (2 kg) of potatoes.

14 lbs = 1 stone = 6.356 kg
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I weigh ten stone three (10 st 3 lbs)/a hundred forty-three pounds (USA)/ sixty-five kilos.

1 pint = 0.57 litres = 1.20 pints (USA)
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Ben drank a pint/half a litre of beer with the meal.

8 pints = 1 gallon = 4.54 litres = 1.20 gallons (USA)
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We bought five gallons/twenty litres of petrol.

50ºF, 10ºC
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The temperature is fifty degrees Fahrenheit, ten degrees Celsius/ Centigrade.


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