not sure activator

 0    36 flashcards    valerianoesteban
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have doubts.[verb phrase not in progressive]. to not be sure whether you should do something or whether it is good or right:
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• Peter promised that it was all for the best, but I still had doubts.
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have doubts about
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• Any doubts Jo had about marrying him soon disappeared.
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have your doubts
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• We had our doubts about the car’s reliability from the start.
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have reservations.[verb phrase not in progressive]. to feel that some things about a plan, idea etc are not good or right, so that you think there may be problems or difficulties:
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• I know you’re very keen to move to the US, but I’m afraid I still have reservations.
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have reservations about
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• Many teachers are likely to have reservations about the new tests.
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have misgivings.[verb phrase]. to not be sure whether something is good or right, because you are worried about what will happen if it is done:
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• We didn’t try to stop our son from joining the army, but we both had misgivings.
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have misgivings about
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• Even the government’s most loyal supporters have misgivings about changes to the education system.
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have serious misgivings be very unsure
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• At the time, many doctors had serious misgivings about the new treatment.
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have mixed feelings.[verb phrase not in progressive]. to be unable to say that something is definitely good or right, because there are both good and bad things about it:
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• I have very mixed feelings – I want to travel but I know I’ll miss my family.
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have mixed feelings about
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• She had mixed feelings about her daughter getting married so young.
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be dubious.[verb phrase]. to be not sure whether you should do something, because you can think of ways in which it could go wrong:
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• I was a bit dubious at first, but the water looked cool and inviting, so I dived in.
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be dubious about
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• Most universities are dubious about accepting students over the age of 30.
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hesitant.[adjective not usually before noun]. someone who is hesitant is nervous or unsure about doing something, and therefore pauses before doing it or does it slowly and without confidence:
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• He was a little hesitant at first, but soon he had told her everything.
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hesitant about
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• I was hesitant about approaching the boss directly.
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hesitant to do something
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• It is not surprising that the government was hesitant to introduce such major reforms.
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hesitantly [adverb]

• The boy spoke slowly and hesitantly, unsure whether or not to trust us.
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waver.[intransitive verb]. to not make a definite decision because you have doubts waver between
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• Maya wavered between accepting and refusing his offer.
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waver about.
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• If people have been wavering about giving the police information, this could be the thing to make them come forward.
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