2.2 CHANGING YOUR MIND: VERB PATTERNS

 0    42 flashcards    josehbaltazar
download mp3 print play test yourself
 
Question English
Answer English

It was great being able to say those things you're usually scared (to say/say/saying) and ask questions you're usually afraid to ask.
Adjective + to + infinitive
start learning
It was great being able to say those things you're usually scared to say and ask questions you're usually afraid to ask.

We were given the freedom (to ask/ask/asking) questions without having to worry about (to be/be/being) judged. I admit (to feel/feel/feeling) a little nervous about a few of the questions.
Noun + to + infinitive (as part of a semi-fixed phrase); verb + -ing; preposition + -ing
start learning
We were given the freedom to ask questions without having to worry about being judged. I admit feeling a little nervous about a few of the questions.

I wanted (to offer/offer/offering) some insights into my job. I took part in the living library event (to challenge/challenge/challenging) stereotypes and misconceptions I'd encountered.
Verb + to + infinitive; to + infinitive used to express purpose
start learning
I wanted to offer some insights into my job. I took part in the living library event to challenge stereotypes and misconceptions I'd encountered.

I enjoyed (to talk/talk/talking) to different people. I learnt more about where my arguments for (to be/be/being) a vegan fall down. I had to apologise for not always being able to answer the question properly.
preposition + -ing; like / love /hate etc. + -ing
start learning
I enjoyed talking to different people. I learnt more about where my arguments for being a vegan fall down. I had to apologise for not always being able to answer the question properly.

They advised me (to be/be/being) as honest as possible.
Verb + object + to + infinitive
start learning
They advised me to be as honest as possible.

(To sleep/Sleep/Sleeping) outside in the middle of winter isn't the problem. Coping with how people treat you is much harder (to deal/deal/dealing) with.
Adjective + to + infinitive; -ing used as a noun (gerund)
start learning
Sleeping outside in the middle of winter isn't the problem. Coping with how people treat you is much harder to deal with.

Verb + to + infinitive
start learning
I decided to explain. I wanted to offer some insights into my job.

Verb + object + to + infinitive
start learning
They encouraged me to apply. They advised me to to be as honest as possible.

Noun + to + infinitive (as part of a semi-fixed phrase)
start learning
It's time to ... We were given the freedom to ask questions.

Adjective + to + infinitive
start learning
I was happy to talk to them. scared to say / afraid to ask / harder to deal with

to + infinitive used to express purpose
start learning
She left early to catch the train. to challenge stereotypes

verb + -ing
start learning
I recall feeling apprehensive. I admit filling a little nervous.

preposition + -ing
start learning
, arguments for being a vegan, apologise for not being

-ing used as a noun (gerund)
start learning
Smoking is bad for you. Sleeping outside; Coping with how...

like / love /hate etc. + -ing
start learning
I hate arguing about politics. I enjoyed talking...

RULES a) Passive infinitive or -ing form
He is always being stopped by police just for the way he looks.
start learning
Use the passive infinitive or -ing form to talk about actions which are done to the subject.

RULES b) Perfect infinitive or -ing form
They seem to have forgotten why we came here.
start learning
Use the perfect infinitive or -ing form to emphasise when one action happens before another.

RULES c) Negative infinitive or -ing form
Not understanding people's reasons for why they do the things they do is a big problem.
start learning
Negatives infinitives or -ing forms can often be made the subject of a sentence, like gerunds.

We all know how important (make/making/to make) a good first impression is.
start learning
We all know how important making a good first impression is.

So, it's vital not (underestimate/underestimating/to underestimate) the importance of choosing your clothes carefully when you go to that key meeting or job interview.
start learning
So, it's vital not to underestimate the importance of choosing your clothes carefully when you go to that key meeting or job interview.

This is your opportunity (impress/impressing/to impress).
start learning
This is your opportunity to impress.

On (walk/walking/to walk) into the room,
start learning
On walking into the room,

most people are likely (to have form/to have forming/to have formed) an opinion of your character based on your appearance in less than three seconds.
start learning
most people are likely to have formed an opinion of your character based on your appearance in less than three seconds.

It's difficult (say/saying/to say)
start learning
It's difficult to say

why people insist on (judge/judging/to judge) by appearances,
start learning
why people insist on judging by appearances,

even when we know that it's so unreliable (do/doing/to do) this.
start learning
even when we know that it's so unreliable to do this.

Even in courtrooms, juries and judges appear (give/giving/to give) lighter sentences to people who are well dressed.
start learning
Even in courtrooms, juries and judges appear to give lighter sentences to people who are well dressed.

I can't bear seeing people smoke in cars.
start learning
correct

* I don't know why you waste all your time sit in front of the computer.
start learning
I don't know why you waste all your time sitting in front of the computer.

* Cooder was encouraged play the guitar by his father.
start learning
Cooder was encouraged to play the guitar by his father.

* They hoped meet up with some of the stars after the show.
start learning
They hoped to meet up with some of the stars after the show.

* I gave up the idea of go into politics when I was in my thirties.
start learning
I gave up the idea of going into politics when I was in my thirties.

* We were tempted ask if we could stay the night, but we thought it might seem rude.
start learning
We were tempted to ask if we could stay the night, but we thought it might seem rude.

I would prefer to have seen it for myself.
start learning
correct

I didn't expect (feel) so embarrassed, but the questions they asked were so personal.
start learning
I didn't expect to feel so embarrassed, but the questions they asked were so personal.

(meet) Linda and (have) the chance to talk about her experience was enlightening.
start learning
Meeting Linda and having the chance to talk about her experience was enlightening.

They had the opportunity (ask) me anything that they wanted.
start learning
They had the opportunity to ask me anything that they wanted.

It's hard (imagine) what it's like to live with a disability.
start learning
It's hard to imagine what it's like to live with a disability.

I wouldn't even contemplate (leave) the country.
start learning
I wouldn't even contemplate leaving the country.

She had refused (marry) the man her parents had chosen for her.
start learning
She had refused to marry the man her parents had chosen for her.

Somehow he seemed (lose) all the money already.
start learning
Somehow he seemed to have lost all the money already.

He is fed up with (be) called rude names.
start learning
He is fed up with being called rude names.


You must sign in to write a comment