lesson 8 ADVERBS

 0    46 flashcards    josehbaltazar
download mp3 print play test yourself
 
Question English
Answer English

An ADVERB modifies
start learning
a verb, an adjective or another adverb.

It indicates
always, afternoon, where, probably after, too, much, surely, maybe, simply
start learning
how, where, when, why or under what conditions something happens.
She always goes to the café in the afternoon where she has a cup of tea, probably after spending too much time outside. Surely she is sad. Or maybe simply tired.

time adverbs: WHEN
start learning
today, yesterday, later, now, last year

time adverbs: HOW OFTEN
start learning
sometimes, frequently, never, often, yearly

time adverbs: FOR HOW LONG
start learning
all day, not long, for a while, since last year

She is pregnant now.
now
start learning
WHEN adverbs are usually placed at the end of the sentence.

She has been pregnant for nine months.
for nine months
start learning
FOR HOW LONG adverbs are usually placed at the end of the sentence.

She has often had strange cravings during her pregnancies.
often. craving: a very strong desire for something: a craving for chocolate
start learning
HOW OFTEN adverbs are usually placed before the main verb but after auxiliary verbs.

HOW OFTEN adverbs that express the exact number of times an action happens
start learning
are usually placed at the end of the sentence.

She has been pregnant for nine months every year for the last decade.
start learning
Order for more than one adverb describing time: FOR HOW LONG, HOW OFTEN, WHEN

interrogative adverbs
start learning
why, where, how, when

Why am I so great?
start learning
Interrogative adverbs are usually placed at the beginning of a question.

relative adverbs
Y'know what? That's the place where you were conceived.
start learning
where, when, why

adverbs of degree
start learning
almost, nearly, just, too, enough, hardly, completely, very

Tom gets quite horny when he drinks coffee.
quite. horny: com tesão
start learning
Tom gets quite horny when he drinks coff in English
adverbs of degree are usually placed before the main verb, or before the adjective they modify.

place adverbs
start learning
everywhere, away, up, around, out, back, in, outside

place adverbs usually go after the main verb.

She takes her husband outside.
start learning
or after the object.

certainty adverbs
start learning
certainly, definitely, probably, undoubtedly, surely

It definitely died. I'm absolutely certain.
start learning
Adverbs of certainty go before the main verb, but after the verb to be.

I have probably seen it before. Its face looks familiar to me.
start learning
With auxiliary verbs, adverbs go between the auxiliary and the main verb.

Undoubtedly, they were quite big.
start learning
Sometimes these adverbs can go at the beginning of the sentence.

manner adverbs
start learning
well, rapidly, slowly, quickly, easily, loudly, softly, beautifully

She spends her salary quickly. She spends it easily.
quickly. easily.
start learning
Manner adverbs usually go after the main verb or the object.

She happily bets against the machine.
start learning
To emphasize, manner adverbs can go before the verb if it's a transitive verb.

viewpoint adverbs
start learning
honestly, frankly, personally, obviously, surely, undoubtedly

Frankly, my Dear, I don't give a damn.
start learning
Viewpoint adverbs go at the beginning of the sentence, and are separated from the rest of the sentence by a comma.

commenting adverbs
start learning
definitely, certainly, obviously, simply

I think she is certainly the worst person I have ever known, don't you think?
start learning
Commenting adverbs are very similar to viewpoint adverbs, but they go after the verb to be and before the main verb.

place prepositions
I live on the 33dr floor, at 205 95th Street in New York.
start learning
IN, ON, AT

IN
in the city, in New York, in bed, in my pocket, in the car
start learning
inside an area or space
in the city, in New York, in bed, in my pocket, in the car

ON
on the table, on the wall, on the floor, on the carpet, on the door
start learning
in contact with a surface
on the table, on the wall, on the floor, on the carpet, on the door

AT
at the corner, at the end of the street, at the entrance, at the station, at the top of the page
start learning
referring to a position
at the corner, at the end of the street, at the entrance, at the station, at the top of the page

TALKING ABOUT TRANSPORTATION: car, truck
start learning
in a / the: car, truck

TALKING ABOUT TRANSPORTATION: subway, bus, train, airplane, ship, bicycle
start learning
on a / the: subway, bus, train, airplane, ship, bicycle

COMMON EXPRESSIONS: IN
start learning
in a car, in a taxi, in an elevator, in the newspaper, in the sky, in Times Square

COMMON EXPRESSIONS: ON
start learning
on a bus, on a train, on an airplane, on the radio, on the Internet, on the left

COMMON EXPRESSIONS: AT
start learning
at home, ar work, at school, at college, at the bottom, at the reception

time prepositions
start learning
IN, ON, AT

IN (time)
in April, in summer, in 1900 / in the 1900s, in the past century, in the future
start learning
months, seasons, years, centuries
in April, in summer, in 1900 / in the 1900s, in the past century, in the future

ON (time)
on Sunday, on Mondays, on September the 4th, on his birthday, on New Year's Eve
start learning
days and dates
on Sunday, on Mondays, on September the 4th, on his birthday, on New Year's Eve

AT (time)
at 5 o'clock, at noon/night, at bedtime, at the moment, at the end of the week
start learning
hours of the clock, points in time
at 5 o'clock, at noon/night, at bedtime, at the moment, at the end of the week

COMMON EXPRESSIONS: IN
start learning
in the morning(s), in the afternoon(s), in the evening(s)

COMMON EXPRESSIONS: ON
start learning
on Tuesday morning(s), on Wednesday afternoon(s), on weekends

COMMON EXPRESSIONS: AT
start learning
at night, at Christmas, at the same time

When using LAST, NEXT, EVERY or THIS
I was depressed last May, I'm planning to rob a bank next Monday, I eat donuts every Christmas, I will take a walk naked this evening.
start learning
don't use in, on, at
I was depressed last May, I'm planning to rob a bank next Monday, I eat donuts every Christmas, I will take a walk naked this evening.


You must sign in to write a comment