Polish English Dictionary

język polski - English

oni in English:

1. they


They quarreled.
If people who smoke are deprived of their cigarettes, they get nervous and irritable.
If you can't visit a country where they speak the language you are learning, find a local bar where native speakers of that language hang out and start hanging out there.
Slighty overweight girls would look cuter if they lost a little weight.
Mathematicians are like French people: whatever you tell them they translate it into their own language and turn it into something totally different.
I wish I could care more about my grades but it seems that, at a certain point of my life, I decided they wouldn't be so important anymore.
The more you look, the more you will see, and the more interesting they will become.
In order to avoid misunderstandings, they went through the contract again.
The work wasn't finished at 11:00 p.m. Friday, so they decided to carry it over to the following Monday.
We all searched high and low for the missing documents, but they were never found.
Tom was talking about the delicious food they had eaten on their trip.
At last, they met face to face.
Without a moment's hesitation, they took drastic action against the conspiracy.
Although the proposal seemed like a good idea, they refused it.
Human beings differ from animals in that they can think and speak.

English word "oni"(they) occurs in sets:

100 najczęściej używanych angielskich słów
100 najczęściej używanych słów języka angielskiego
100 najczęściej używanych słów j, angielskiego
SŁOWNICTWO 6 (WRZESIEŃ 2011)
zaimki osobowe, przymiotniki dzierżawcze słownictw...

2. they're


They're inside.
Children aren't naturally obedient any more than they're naturally well mannered.
My roommate is prodigal when it comes to spending money on movies; he buys them the day they're released, regardless of price.
The turbulent sands above our heads, the flinging of our swords... they're naught but falling stars in the night sky.
They say fine words are no virtue if they're insincere and that's him in a nutshell. He's all talk but doesn't mean a word of it.
Why am I the only one they complain of? They're just making an example out of me and using me as a scapegoat.
What makes the classics both intriguing and fascinating is that they're near enough that we can feel the similarity and they're distant enough that we have to do some work to bridge the gap.
There used to be a lot of small creeks in old time Shanghai, which included Zhaojia Creek and Yangjing Creek, but they're all covered up nowadays.
It seems as it was a shot-gun wedding so they're having a quiet wedding with only family and a couple of friends from university invited.
Those two are blindly enraptured with each other right now but they say first meeting someone is the first step toward goodbye. I wonder if they're aware of that.
In Japan the ring shaped ones came into use first so they're also often called "contraceptive rings".
On the way out I said to my waitress, "Be careful, Sue. There's something funny about the glasses you gave me - they're filled in on the top, and there's a hole on the bottom!"
There was a problem with the architecture of that company's new computer. They're going through a recall frenzy right now.
They're stupid children, what a nuisance, she said. I replied praising them: "What are you saying, They're both smart, with a good memory and a promising future"
That's because they're the classic places for 'something' to appear. Like the grand piano that plays by itself, the human anatomical model that moves by itself ...